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From East to West: Women's Rights Towards Equality and the Urgency for Continued Progress



Women's rights have come a long way in both Eastern and Western countries. While there is still a long way to go, women have made significant progress in the fight for equality and the recognition of their rights. In this article, we will explore some specific examples of women's rights in both Eastern and Western countries.


In the West

In western countries, women's rights have made significant progress in recent years. Women can vote, own property, and hold public office. They have access to education, healthcare, and job opportunities. Women in Western countries have also made significant strides in the fight for equal pay and the elimination of discrimination in the workplace.


One example of the progress of women's rights in the Western world is

Sweden, where gender equality is deeply ingrained in the country's culture and politics. Sweden has a feminist government, and the country has implemented policies to promote gender equality, including parental leave for both mothers and fathers and a government-funded childcare system.


In the East

In Eastern countries, women's rights have also made significant progress. However, women in these countries still face many challenges, including discrimination and limited access to education and healthcare.


Particularly, women’s rights in India haven seen significant changes for the better. In 2015, the Indian government launched the Beti Bachao Beti Padhao campaign, which aimed to address the issue of female feticide and promote the education of girls. The campaign has been successful in increasing the number of girls enrolled in schools and promoting the importance of girls' education.


Another example is Saudi Arabia, where women were granted the right to drive in 2018. This move was a significant milestone in the fight for women's rights in Saudi Arabia, where women's movements are still restricted, and women must obtain permission from a male guardian to travel, work, or marry.



Similarly, women in parts of Asia still face significant challenges in their fight for equal rights. For example, in Afghanistan, women have limited access to education, healthcare, and job opportunities. The Taliban's recent return to power in Afghanistan raises concerns about the protection of women's rights in the country.

While women's rights have come a long way in both Eastern and Western continents, there is still a long way to go. Women still face many challenges, including discrimination and limited access to education and healthcare, and there are still many parts of the world where women's rights are not recognized or protected. The fight for women's rights is ongoing, and it is up to all of us to continue to push for equality and justice for all women, regardless of where they live or what their circumstances may be.


Most importantly, the consequences of inaction on women's rights can be severe and long-lasting. When women's rights are not protected or promoted, it can result in a range of negative outcomes, including:


1. Continued gender-based discrimination: Inaction on women's rights can lead to the perpetuation of gender-based discrimination, which can manifest in many different ways, including lower pay for women, limited access to education, and restricted job opportunities. This can lead to a vicious cycle of poverty and limited opportunities for women, which can impact not only women but also their families and communities.



2. Violence against women: Inaction on women's rights can also lead to an increase in violence against women, including domestic violence, sexual assault, and harassment. When women are not protected under the law, or when they are not taken seriously when they report incidents of violence, it can create a culture of impunity where perpetrators feel emboldened to continue their abusive behavior.


3. Health consequences: Women's health can also be negatively impacted by inaction on women's rights. When women do not have access to adequate healthcare, it can result in poor health outcomes, including higher rates of maternal mortality, lower life expectancy, and limited access to reproductive healthcare.


4. Economic consequences: Inaction on women's rights can also have negative economic consequences. When women are not given equal opportunities to work or earn a fair wage, it can impact their ability to provide for themselves and their families. This can result in increased poverty rates, lower economic growth, and a lack of progress toward achieving sustainable development goals.


5. Political consequences: Inaction on women's rights can also have political consequences, including limited representation of women in government and decision-making positions. When women's voices are not heard, it can result in policies that do not reflect the needs and experiences of half of the population.

In conclusion, the consequences of inaction on women's rights can be significant and far-reaching. It is essential that governments, organizations, and individuals work together to promote and protect women's rights to ensure that all women can live healthy, safe, and fulfilling lives.

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